How to make sure an architectural photography shoot goes smoothly - my thoughts after a recent shoot at a fantastic Dorset wedding vennue

I just wanted to share some thoughts after a recent architectural photography shoot that I have now completed. 

I hope that these thoughts are helpful to you all when planning any kind of photographic shoot.  I am writing this after carrying out a photography shoot for an architect of a mill that has been converted to a stunning Dorset weddding venue.

This was one of the scenes I shot, captured using my iPhone 7 Plus.

 Sopley Mill being photographed by Rick McEvoy Photography

Sopley Mill being photographed by Rick McEvoy Photography

You can see my Canon 6D and Canon 17-40mm lens mounted on my Manfrotto 190 Go tripod with Manfrotto XPRO geared head. I have my Neewer viewer attached to the back of my Canon 6D.

I know, how lovely a location is this?  The location is Sopley Mill, which is a fantastic wedding venue in Dorset.

This is one of the reasons why I love my work. I get to work in and photograph fantastic locations like this.

Back to the subject - how to make sure an architectural photography shoot goes smoothly - well that is title of the post - here are 10 things to consider. Yes I know - I should have called this post "10 things to consider when planning a commercial shoot". You can expect to see that on the Improve Photography website some time soon now that I think about it!

  1. Plan the shoot
  2. Work to the plan
  3. Know the brief
  4. Photograph to the brief
  5. Prepare for the unexpected
  6. Have all the gear you will need
  7. Allow plenty of time
  8. Shoot knowing people will be popping in all the time!
  9. Prepare your gear
  10. Relax and get on with it!

Finally, a word on timing.

If you are photographing a building for an architect you will not necessarily have the luxury of waiting for that stunning sunset. The reality of being an architectural photographer is that you have to make the best of what is in front of you at the time.

I therefore plan shoots around weather forecasts, which is a challenge here in England, but still am left with what I encounter on the day! Forget any ideas of doing every shoot in golden light capturing perfect moments and dramatic light - that is not reality.

I only had one chance to get the pictures I wanted, as I had to photograph the wedding venue when it had been set up for a wedding. Otherwise it would not look like a wedding venue!

That and the client deadline meant that the first day where there was a wedding being set up in an afternoon and the weather looked good was when I had to do the shoot!

And that is what I did. And all that planning and preparation paid off, and I got some really nice images.

Rick McEvoy Photography - Architectural Photographer in Dorset